Ubuntu 14.04 ist da – und nichts passiert

Vor zwei Tagen war es soweit: die neue Ubuntu Version meldete sich über die Aktualisierungsverwaltung an – wie üblich nicht penetrant, sondern freundlich und auch bereit, erst einmal zu warten bis zur Installation.

Der Desktop nach der  Aktualisierung. Screenshot: pb

Aktualisiert habe ich dann aber gleich anschließend, nicht ohne das Notebook (ein Thinkpad X1)an die Steckdose anzustöpseln und nach ein paar bestätigenden Klicks erst mal in Ruhe zu lassen. Nach ungefähr einer Stunde, inklusive einem Neustart, hat sich 14.04 materialisiert.

So unspektakulär wie die Installation ist seither auch das Verhalten: unauffällig, gefühlt etwas schneller reagierend und: es gibt nichts zu kritisieren, einfach, weil alles weiterhin funktioniert.

Ubuntu 14.04 meldet sich an. Screenshot: pb

Alles Wichtige zur neuen Version und zu den anderen für manche älteren Rechner besser geeigneten gibt es hier http://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/Trusty_Tahr

Wie man auf Ubuntu umsteigt, habe ich hier beschrieben.

Andrew Hodges: The Enigma

One of the things coming with being a fan of Benedict Cumberbatch is getting to know about books you’ve never heard of and you probably never would have read because they simply exist out of your horizon – or are simply not available in your country and language.

The German version and the original English one. Photo: pb

Andrew Hodges‘ „The Enigma“ is such a book that appeared in my life just because I learned back in 2013 that Benedict was about to play Alan Turing in the film „The Imitation Game“. Surprisingly enough I did know that Alan Turing was the man that helped breaking the German Code during the Second World War with the help of the Enigma machine – something I must have stumbled upon during school (thanks to my teachers and German curriculum).

„For him there had to be a reason for everything;
 it had to make sense – and to make one sense, not two.“

Because of the topic – oh God, it has something to do with maths which I’ll never understand in German how could I handle this in English?! – I tried and failed getting a German version of Hodges‘ book when I wanted it. So I gave an English kindle version a try just because it is cheaper and you know you do have a dictionary at hand when you are lost in language and maths. But I hardly needed it because Andrew Hodges did a very good job walking on the edge in between historical facts, technical explanations and bringing a man to life that was not only far ahead of his time when it comes to science or technology. He also was a man struggling to find his own way in a society that couldn’t cope with homosexuality as a normal form of living and loving but made it illegal forcing women and men to live their lives like criminals.

„Like any homosexual man, he (Alan) was living an imitation game, not in the sense of conscious play-acting, but by being accepted as a person that he was not“, Hodges writes. Being a highly intelligent man, Alan Turing didn’t care about his appearance but concentrated on his work and somehow on his own world in which the simple and clear rules of science were all that matter at least to him. But he also was very well aware of the fact that the society he lived in wouldn’t tolerate his sexuality: „He had wanted the commonest in nature; he liked ordinary things. But he found himself to be an ordinary English homosexual atheist mathematician. It would not be easy.“

Andrew Hodges‘ autobiography is full of historical facts, science stuff and biographical details that show that the author did a very proper and deep research. Far more it is a tribute to Alan Turing – full of love and admiration – who thought about computer and the way they might think and communicate with one another long before the word had it’s meaning and long before the word internet was even invented.  „Enigma“ is a historical document and a thrilling novel that is a joy to read.

Andrew Hodges: Alan Turing – The Enigma, Vintage Books
Deutsche Ausgabe: Springer-Verlag, Wien.

If part of this article sound weird this is due to the fact that I’m not a native speaker, so don’t be too harsh.
Feel free to share this blog entry but please quote and link properly.

Cumbercollective: Fans that are different

So you do have a hobby? You are addicted to your plants in the garden, you’re passionate when it comes to cooking and baking and you are a fan of a football  team? Relax, everything is fine, there is nothing to worry about – at least till it comes to Benedict Cumberbatch. What a comparison, you may think (I see you are shaking your head) but think it over.

Benedict on BBC about his love for formula one. Screenshot: pb/BBC

Have a look at the meaning of  „fan“ and you’ll find explanations like „enthusiast“or „admirer“  – which is exactly what fans do when their team wins the match: they cry, they laugh, they jump and they have nothing else to talk about when they meet other fans no matter if they’re meeting online or in real life.
Fans of Benedict Cumberbatch gather in front of the telly to watch a film or a series the British actor takes part. They cry, they laugh, they jump and they have nothing else to talk about when they meet other fans not matter if they’re meeting online or in real life.

„Your loyalty means a lot.
It gives me courage to take risks
and enjoy what I’m doing.“
Source: Indiatoday

Of course you get the parallels. Would you say being a fan of lets say football makes you automatically insane and stupid? No? Why do you think Benedict’s fans are insane and stupid? Why do you think that they are foolish girls only dreaming of their idol, unable to talk in full sentences, only sighing and swooning and screaming? It’s because you don’t really understand what this fandom is about, maybe because you only read the headlines of the yellow press which will always use „Cumberbitches“ to lure more clicks on their websites and more readers to their papers instead of keeping up to date and do their researches properly as Sherlock would grumble.

To set the record straight: Yes, members of the Cumbercollective (and of course the author of this blog) are chatting about Benedict, his appearance (Did you see his hair? Doesn’t this colour fit him well?), his beautiful voice (best listened to with earphones), his hands (yes, they are very huge) or his clothes (Tuxedos & suits! Scarfs & Flipflops! Hats & Glasses!). With his ability to play every characters on the big screen, on telly or doing radio plays, Benedict proves that he is in fact a class of his own. And he forces his fans stretch their brains, learning about such different topics like code breaking because of Alan Turing and the upcoming film „The Imitation Game“, motion caption and JRR Tolkien because of the dragon Smaug in „The Hobbit“ or tyres and high speed cars because he was at the Formula 1 race in Kuala Lumpur. (Yes, there are pics from an Jaguar ice driving course in Finland – but who cares about the cars?)

It is true that fans come together because Benedict is out there, but what is so special about this fandom is that many fans are grown-up women, getting their daily stuff done in real life, are interested and well informed about such different things as literature, films, sports, architecture, history and politics. Many are fluent in at least two languages – English is mandatory if your want to listen to Benedict’s voice – and always ready to help. Want a magazine from another country, a mug from a shop that doesn’t ship abroad, tips for your next trip to US, not sure if the DVD works in your country, badly in need of a live stream? Just drop a line on twitter – and get answers.
Don’t worry if it takes a few hours till they get back to you: Cumbercollective as a whole is always wide awaken and literally everywhere in the world. Due to time shifts they are on duty or simply asleep.

If part of this article sound weird this is due to the fact that I’m no native speaker, so don’t be too harsh.
Feel free to share this blog entry but please quote and link properly.