Buchtipp: Eine Kamera und ein schlaues Mädchen

Geburtstage sind aufregend. Jedenfalls dann, wenn man ein Mädchen ist, Hannah Halblicht heißt, zehnten Geburtstag hat – und auf dem Frühstückstisch ein seltsames Päckchen vorfindet. „Die eine Seite funkelt wie ein Regenbogen und die andere Hälfte der Verpackung ist rabenschwarz“, staunt Hannah und auch ihr Freund Leo ist ratlos.

Die Titelseite von Hanna Halblicht. Screenshot: pb

Die Titelseite von Hanna Halblicht. Screenshot: pb

Aber das ist noch nicht alles. Denn die Kamera, die mit dem geheimnisvollen Geschenkpapier verpackt ist, ist alles andere als eine einfache Kamera (wenn man das von digitalen Kameras überhaupt sagen kann). Zwar hat sie alles, was eine „normale“ Kamera auch hat, inklusive verschieden farbiger Knöpfe. Aber wenn man etwas fotografiert, verändert sich das, was man gerade fotografiert hat. Es scheint so, als könne die Kamera Wünsche erfüllen  – oder tut sie noch viel mehr?

„Hanna Halblicht“ ist ein wunderschönes Märchen für Kinder, aber auch für Erwachsene. Es steckt voller Fantasie, voller Gefühle (ohne kitschig zu werden) und voller Überraschungen.

Das E-Book ist für erhältlich bei Amazon, Apple, Google, Thalia,  als pdf, Neobooks

Mehr zum Buch und zum Autor gibt es hier.

A tribute to a true hero

With anniversaries of both World Wars, it seems we are flooded with documentaries, books and radio plays. And even despite the fact that this topic is a very important one, people could be bored getting another film situated in the Second World War.

„The Imitation Game“ is not just another film about one of the darkest periods in European history. It is a tribute to the true hero Alan Turing who helped breaking the German enigma code, win the war for the allies and saved thousands of lives. But it’s also a tragedy. Alan, who people always looked at as somehow different, awkward and not of this world, lived the life of a man who always was true to himself. He deeply cared for his work as a mathematician, dived into solving any problem and was – for all we learn from the people who knew him –  a very warm hearted man who happened to be gay in a time when homosexuality was illegal.

„You need me more than I need you.“ Alan Turing in his job interview

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Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing – from a trailer of „The Imitation Game“. Screenshot: pb

Director Morten Tyldum’s film is all you want to have in a really good movie: it is heartwarming, funny, heartbreaking, sad and thrilling. And it is a story about Alan Turing (played by Benedict Cumberbatch), a man who loyally served his country, lived with all the secrets about his work at Bletchley Park during the war but instead of celebrating him as a war hero and giving him all the honour a country could give, was prosecuted for his sexuality, treated with oestrogens, intending to free him of his homosexuality. And if this wasn’t enough he was considered being unreliable of keeping secrets and was refused to continue his cryptographic work for the British Government Communications Headquarters.

Benedict Cumberbatch performs the role of his life. His Alan is vulnerable, arrogant, funny and he always does and says what he thinks is right at this special moment. And even if he doesn’t say anything, you know exactly what is going on in his mind – you just have to look to realise what only a brilliant actor is able to do: telling a whole story with a tiny movement within his face. The scenes with Keira Knightley who is Joan Clarke, a fellow mathematician and cryptanalysis who was in a relationship with Alan and still cared very deeply for him till his death and even afterwards, are far away from any kitsch film makers could squeeze into them.

„The Imitation Game“ is the must see film of this winter. It deserves all the awards the film industry has to offer.

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More about Alan Turing:

Andrew Hodges: The Enigma – the biography the film is based on. Read my review here.

Sinclair McKay: The Secret Life of Bletchley Park

Alan M. Turing: Centenary Edition

Official page of The Imitation Game

Bletchley Park

Bletchley Park Podcast – Apple users click here.

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Not weird, not stupid, but happy

Two people fall in love  and decide to marry. Isn’t that a most lovely thing to announce in an old fashioned way by an ad in a newspaper? Those who don’t feel happy for the couple must lack feelings at all.

Benedict Cumberbatch did exactly that – rumours know that he previously talked to his soon to be mother in law – and fits all the speculations fans have about a man who isn’t only one of the best actors of his generation. Benedict is as humble and polite, funny and intelligent as a perfect human being could be. At least this is what fans get to know from interviews or even from meeting him in real life. Is  it really such a surprise that he inspires his fans in so many ways and is adored for being the man he is?

No, it isn’t. And no, you don’t have to understand it. But why don’t you just accept that the Cumbercollective loves and adores Benedict Cumberbatch? That his fans are not weird, nor stupid? But people who are very friendly, kind and connected all over the world? And no: we are not Cumberbitches for heaven’s sake. It’s more than two years ago. Of course I know that this word is used to get more clicks on a webpage. But this doesn’t mean that it is okay to use it. It only proves the fact that there are journalists out there who are so arrogant in their struggle to stay above all things, trying not to get emotionally engaged, that they find fans‘ reaction nothing more than ridiculous.

If you read my blog on a regular basis (Hi, reader!) or are following me on Twitter (Hi follower!), you know that I am a journalist myself. I do believe that it is important to get facts right, to stay neutral, to get all the information you can get on the topic you’re writing about, even when you have to face a deadline. But I will never understand why some journalists think that they are something special, that they want to teach their readers right from wrong. And why they are laughing at fans.

Maybe it’s because I’m only working at a local newspaper, in a town where people recognise me in the supermarket and will tell me straight in the face what they hate about my last article. Or what they liked.

Maybe it’s because I’m part of the Cumbercollective. And I am proud of it.